Time Well Spent

“The proper function of man is to live, not to exist. I shall not waste my days in trying to prolong them. I shall use my time.” Jack London

Another friend has died. He used his time.

Friend is such a strong word I hesitate to use it. Tim was always friendly to me, though, and that meant a great deal. He also loved my best friend very much and that counts beyond measure.

Tim was a complete overachiever in in the best meaning of those words. He was a physician, a plantsman of the first order, an accomplished photographer and a singer. He collected pottery and juke boxes and poker chips. Little escaped his interest. Few subjects resisted his intellect.

Tim was always laughing and every photograph shows him smiling. He had this mischievous smile when he was thinking out a joke, a pun, or a play on words, It was as if he was reveling in the thought before he expressed it. Playing with it. Thinking what a joy it was to think.

Tim was sick for a long, long time. He battled death and all the miserable medical procedures and pain that proceeded it for many years. His partner was also sick at the same time and remains so to this day.

Lived well, died poorly. That’s too often heard. We can’t control our death. With luck, with grace, we control our lives before then. Tim and his partner traveled extensively before his death, he got reacquainted with old friends, he continued caring, he enjoyed life even while spent, tired, and gravely ill.

We should all spend our time as well.

Tim, rest in peace.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Finishing The Book

PLEASE NOTE: As my August 1, 2019 book deadline draws near, I will not be posting as much at this site. Instead, consider following me on Instagram, from your smartphone or desktop.

https://www.instagram.com/tgfarley/

My Instagram account is fun and easier to do than blog posts. Thanks!


Here’s my plan leading up to August 1st.

May: 500 words a day on all unfinished topics until completed.

June: Organizing all materials into the chapters described in my original proposal. Heavy revising to get word count down.

July 1 to the 7th. Quick trip to south-eastern Utah and southern Colorado to collaborate info found on-line, through interviews, and to take pictures.

July 7th to August 1st. Processing photos, final revising, organizing all materials into the publisher’s Dropbox folder as previously requested.

No travel this month save for a two day trip to San Francisco for dental work. No rockhounding, play, or extra-curricular activities save that needed to complete the book.

Below. Quartz infused rock exhibiting some botryoidal texture. Another mystery of the universe. Amargosa Valley, Nevada.

Posted in non-fiction writing, organizing writing, revising writing, rocks and lapidary, southwestrockhounding.com, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Goldfield Gemfield Gem Claims Update

PLEASE NOTE: As my August 1, 2019 book deadline draws near, I will not be posting as much at this site. Instead, consider following me on Instagram, from your smartphone or desktop.

https://www.instagram.com/tgfarley/

My Instagram account is fun and easier for me to do than blog posts. Thanks!


Sharon Artlip has been in touch. She and her sister Nadiah Beekum own the Gemfield Gem claims in Goldfield, Nevada. (internal link)

I’ve written quite a bit about the claims at this site and also in the May, 2016 issue of Rock&Gem Magazine. Another name for the claims now seems to be “The Rainbow Chalcedony Claims.”

Sharon writes that, “It has been a wonderful couple of years.  We are still having fun at Gemfield and always trying to improve it.  If you would like I will send you the current brochure.”

Here’s a link below to the current brochure in .pdf, archived at this site. (internal link).

2019-03-Gemfield Gem-Claims-History-pamphlet

This is a link to Sharon’s website supporting the claims:

http://www.gemfieldnv.com

And here’s a postcard photo of the claims. Click here (internal link) or on the image for a much bigger view:

Sharon holding chalcedony in Goldfield at Bryan Smalley’s Hidden Treasure Trading Company. Note her truck’s new personalized plates.

Posted in non-fiction writing, rocks and lapidary, southwestrockhounding.com, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Revising Work From Overseas

In today’s interconnected world, editors may be asked to edit and revise the work of people for whom English is not their first language. While I am revising these writer’s efforts, I am humbled knowing I could never write in another language as well as these authors. It is my job, however, to make their writing should like a native speaker.

Here are my revisions of some such work.

Before:

After you got into an accident, the responsible party’s insurance company will send you a series of documents to sign. One of the forms you will likely sign is a Medical Authorization Release. This permits the insurance provider to check your personal medical history to determine the value of your personal injury case. If you’re concerned about whether you should sign it or not, then make sure you understand what each paperwork is about before signing any of them. If you don’t know what they could mean for you, then you should consult with an attorney.

After:

After you have been in an accident, the responsible party’s insurance company will send you a set of documents to sign. One vital form stands out: a Medical Authorization Release. Signing this lets the insurance provider check your personal medical history to determine the value of your injury case. If you don’t understand how that release or any of their paperwork may impact your case, consult an attorney.

Before:

The Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Labor recently announced that they have decided to issue an additional 30,000 I-2C visas until September 30 this year. This means that foreign nationals who hope to work a seasonal job in the US may have a better chance of entering the country.

After:

The Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Labor will issue 30,000 additional I-2C visas until September 30th of this year. Foreign nationals who hope to work a seasonal job in the US may have a better chance of entering the country.

Before:

It’s not surprising to find out the multitude of nursing homes in Kentucky as subjects of complaints. According to the Department of Public Health, its Department’s 24-hours a day Nursing Home Hotline processes as many as 19,000 calls annually. Throughout the years, nursing homes have been linked to several issues such as neglect, abuse and all sorts of misconducts. For those with loved ones inside nursing home facilities, this is both alarming and necessary reasons to always be on the lookout. If you suspect that someone you love or know may be having a negative experience in a nursing home, here’s what you need to know.

After:

Kentucky nursing homes are frequent and continuing subjects of complaints. The State’s Department of Public Health runs a 24 hour-a-day Nursing Home Hotline. It gets nearly 19,000 calls each year. Over the years, nursing homes have been responsible for neglect, abuse, and all manner of misconduct. Anyone with a loved one inside a nursing home should be alarmed by these statistics. These numbers demand that friends and family must always look for warning signs. Here’s what to know if you suspect that someone you love or know may be getting poor or abusive treatment at a nursing home.

Before:

Ndot has taken a more significant step to keep Clark County roads safer by replacing 800 of the controversial guardrail X-Lite sections across the state. According to statement from the state, it is taking a proactive step to address concerns about the guardrail’s parts not up to par with field performance expectations. The planned X-Lite product replacement will cost as much as $20 million although the federal highway regulations do not require it.

After:

Ndot has taken a significant step to keep Clark County roads safer by replacing certain parts on guardrails in Clark County and across the state. Numbering 804 in all, these so-called X-Lite sections have generated controversy in several states for possibly causing fatalities. According to a statement from the department, it is replacing these parts to address concerns about the guardrail’s components not meeting performance expectations. Ndot will spend as much as $20 million on replacing the X-Lite sections although federal highway regulations do not mandate that they do so.

Before:

The United States Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) said that motor vehicle crashes declined consistently throughout the years, although the same can’t be said for wrong-way driving incidents. Approximately 300 people die from wrong-way crashes every year. In Las Vegas alone, two accidents already occurred this year. One man died on Interstate 5 near Downtown Las Vegas last January, while another one did on Interstate 805 near Rocky Ridge last March.

After:

The United States Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reports that motor vehicle crashes have been on the decline for the last several years. That, unfortunately, cannot be said for wrong-way driving accidents. Approximately 300 people die from wrong-way crashes every year. In Las Vegas alone, two accidents have already occurred this year. One man died on Interstate 5 near downtown Las Vegas in January, while another man died on Interstate 805 near Rocky Ridge in March.

Before:

Companies must also get operating permits every six months in January and June. The permit will provide more details about the size of every fleet. Companies must even settle any related fees that will be imposed by the City Council. According to the mayor’s proposal, these include $150 per device and $235 per permit.

After:

Under the new regulations, companies must get operating permits every six months in January and June. To be approved, the permit application must provide information on the size of a companies’ fleet. Companies must also pay any fees imposed by the City Council. According to the mayor’s proposal, these charges include $150 for each device and $235 for the permit itself.

Before:

Highways and trucks always pose a risk to both drivers and passengers. Recently, two truck rollover accidents on the roads of Las Vegas highlighted that risk. The accidents killed two people and injured another one as a semi-trucked flipped over Sandy Valley, and another big rig crashed and overturned a few miles southwest of Spring Mountain State Park. Truck-related accidents are so common that they affect so many people. If you or your loved one has been involved in this type of accident, then it is best to call an attorney. The following sections will discuss more the dangers of trucks in Las Vegas and what you can do legally when you or someone you know is involved in one.

After:

Large commercial trucks on highways can pose great risks to drivers and passengers of ordinary vehicles. Recently, two truck rollover accidents on Las Vegas roads highlighted this danger. These accidents killed two people and injured another as a semi-trucked flipped over in Sandy Valley, and another big rig overturned a few miles southwest of Spring Mountain State Park. Truck-related accidents are common and impact many people. If you or your loved one has been involved in this type of accident, call an attorney. The following sections detail the dangers trucks present in Las Vegas and what to do when you or someone you know is involved in a truck related accident.

Posted in editing writing, non-fiction writing, organizing writing, revising writing, Thoughts on writing, Uncategorized, Writing by others, Writing tips | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

What is Your Nom de Plume?

A nom de plume is a pen name or alias. Mine is Fresno Bob. I rarely use it but I like its obscurity factor.

Fresno Bob is a character we never see in John Carpenter’s movie Escape From New York. Good, mindless fun.

Kurt Russel plays Snake Pliscan and Harry Dean Stanton plays Brain. Adrienne Barbeau plays Maggie. Ernest Borgnine plays Cabbie. Very 80’s.

Here’s the only mention of Fresno Bob:

Snake looks at Brain. He knows this guy.

SNAKE
Harold Helman.

Brain puts down his book and stands up.

BRAIN
Snake?

MAGGIE
“Harold”?

SNAKE
Where you been, Harold? It’s been a long time.

MAGGIE
You never told me you knew Snake Plissken, Brain.

CABBIE
Isn’t that great? Hey, Brain, I could use some gas if you can spare
some . . .

No one pays attention. Snake advances on Brain. Brain sits down.

SNAKE
I’m glad you remember me. Yeah. A man should remember his past.
Kansas City, four years ago. You ran out on me. You left me sitting
there.

BRAIN
You were late.

SNAKE
We were buddies, Harold. You, me, and Fresno Bob. You know what they
did to Bob?

His face changes. He suddenly kicks Brain’s chair into the wall and
points his gun.


Great article and images from the site linked below:

The Weary World of Escape From New York


ESCAPE FROM NEW YORK Credit: [ AVCO EMBASSY / THE KOBAL COLLECTION ]

Posted in Thoughts on writing, Writing tips | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

We All Get Stressed

My dentist doesn’t want to treat me any more. The anxiety and difficulty I have with procedures is causing him stress. The dental office manager says a patient’s stress produces stress on a dentist, making it more difficult to care for the patient. Perhaps, says, the manager, another dentist will do?

Stress? Really? Or maybe the real reason is that the practice overbooks, not giving the dentist enough time to deal with an occasional phobic patient. Or perhaps the dentist didn’t have any patience to begin with. Here’s an idea: the dentist should get professional, get back to work, or get out of his damned trade.

Stress. We all deal with it. A mom raising kids by herself is stressed around the clock. She can’t neglect her children or pass them on to someone else because she is stressed. An EMT or a tow truck driver sees horrible things at an accident. They have jobs to do, however, and they all get on with their work. We all have to deal.

I had a  badly needed job that was so stressful it gave me anxiety diarrhea before every shift. For three years I took a double dose of Imodium before going to work. That prevented having any “accidents” on the job. When I  could finally quit that job, I did. But during that time I managed. I had to. We are all stressed at different times.

I didn’t handle that office call well. I blew up. I ended up yelling at the office manager. Stress? My Dad and his colleagues handled stress trying to save people’s lives. They were even more stressed, perhaps, when they had to tell a family that their loved one had died. That’s stress. But professionals carry on.

My Dad referred many patients to specialists or others when treatment required care or knowledge beyond his ability. Although I was not in his office throughout his career, it is inconceivable to me that he passed off a patient to another doctor because he was stressed. You finish what you start. That may be the first rule for engineers, but it applies to medical practitioners as well.

I am now in the difficult position of finding another practice to take on my case, my dental implant procedure now incomplete. I’m not sure another dentist can do that. They may become liable for a problem they didn’t create. My former dentists are in San Francisco, so I’d have to fly from Las Vegas to get treatment there. I am considering this. Stress. Again, get professional and get on with it. Like the rest of us.

Instagram: tgfarley

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Darkest Performance by Johnny Cash

With his voice giving out, Johnny Cash gave a rousing, sometimes joyous rendition of Cocaine Blues in his famous 1968 Folsom Prison concert. Best known from that concert was Folsom Prison Blues, with Cash delivering its signature line, “I shot a man in Reno, just to watch him die.”

Much darker than that song is Cocaine Blues, originally written by T. J. “Red” Arnall, and reworked by Cash to fit his convict audience. I was not aware of this performance until recently, probably because it never received air play.

Jimi Hendrix, Neil Young, and Soundgarden have all performed songs about killing women; perhaps it shouldn’t shock me that Johnny Cash did, too. Those other songs, though, are tinged with regret and melancholy. The only regret Cash’s character expresses is at getting caught.

I’m not aware that any film of this performance exists.

Posted in Thoughts on writing, Uncategorized, Writing by others | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment