The Odd World of Kessinger Publishing

Update: March 31, 2021

Sade checked in:

“You guys just saved me from posting a check to my account for $1,950 for equipment. i eas really excited about $30 a hour.”

Update: March 29, 2021

Ashley checked in:

“WOW this company started off with a FACEBOOK JOB LISTING to work from home remote COVID-19!! So of course, I applied through Facebook. To have them message me with a phone number for another person in Whats App. After an hour long process, they ask me if they can send me a check for an Apple Book Pro 2, and software. *RED FLAG* WHAAT?! why on earth would someone send me money to purchase that? they said no! this is a start up fee in which you will have to pay us back for. *HUGE RED FLAG* i said nope ! nevermind! and didn’t go any further from there. Thank God I found this website, to know that I was not the only one that they attempted to mastermind and steal from. I am so sorry that happened to that one girl, thank you SO SO much for sharing.”

Update: March 26, 2021

Angela checked in:

“I’m literally in an interview as we speak with someone named Anastacia Royce saying she is one of the HR officers at Kessinger. Her English is a little off but may not be her first language, but it still makes me skeptical. I went through the entire interview and she’s not answering a particular question of mine. She didn’t even ask if I had questions, I had to make it known.

At first I was wondering if I was talking with a real person cause it seemed like the questions were copy and paste. My mom sent me the link through FB. Someone posted the job and their profile has nothing on it except residency and a picture of them. I’m thinking of messaging them if they work here remotely or even has anything to do with this company. This is weird! I just read your other blog of other people’s experiences and it almost lines up with what I just went through.”

Update: February 22, 2020

This  is from the official United Government Federal Trade Commission:

“Report Job Scams to the FTC

If you see or lose money to a job scam, report it to the FTC at ReportFraud.ftc.gov. You can also report it to your state attorney general.

Find out more about how to avoid scams at ftc.gov/scams.”

Update: February 20, 2021

Yikes! This just came in from Sofia. Full comment at the bottom of this page.

“I have been robbed by this people!!! This is unbelievable I’m so mad I didn’t saw this page after sending them money! It was the same history, a “work from home” job offer, $30 per hour, they did an “interview” with “Tom Roger” with me on the WhatsApp they gave me, this is the phone number (205) 605 9408, they sent me a check for $1.350 then asked me to transfer it via ZELLE to samarelay@gmail.com ($750) and ronda_holly@yahoo.com($600) then they blocked me and the check was returned, I got my bank account on negative and almost closed, I’m going to the police right now to report it. This is crazy, this people is taking money from innocent people I can’t believe it we have stop them NOW!”

Update: February 17, 2021

New Comment at the bottom of the page. Looks like Kessinger is dangling $30 an hour in front of people. That’s nonsense.

Update: February 14, 2021

Another person has come forward regarding the work at home scheme offered by Kessinger. Some sort of dodge to get people to buy software. Jason’s story fits in what another person experienced last month, a plan to get money out of the applicant instead of getting them work.

Whatever Kessinger is doing, it is making people miserable. Not only their republishing business but this work at home offer.

Update: January 29, 2021

I’ve just been contacted by a person who applied for work at Kessinger and says that they now deeply regret giving Kessinger their home address. Until I read through all of this aplplicant’s correspondence, I would say to withold your address if you are applying to Kessinger. At least until you find out more about them or if you are willing to take a risk.

— A little further. Kessinger is asking applicants for their banking information before they get hired. And they are stating that employees can’t use their own equipment, rather, they want to send a check for the applicant to buy a new computer and a huge amount of software. I have never heard about this approach before.

For the last five  years I have worked under contract for a company that did work for law firms across the United States and Canada. All of us team members, those in the States and abroad, used our own equipment. There was never a question about ethics in doing so, indeed, for most online work, you have to have to have your own computer before you are hired. What gives here?

Kessinger wants to send a hardcopy check to the applicant and not an online deposit. Even stranger. The applicant would then have a check pending for thousands of dollars in their account, money that could vaporize at any time. They are luring people on with a promise of $25 an hour but then they say $10 an hour for their online training period. I am not accusing anyone of anything, I just find this strange. Really strange.

I’d stick with PayPal if anyone sends me money that could disappear. A check isn’t real money until it moves from Pending to Posted. You have some protection through PayPal. But asking people to buy equipment just for their employ is really odd. For their ethics? What ethics? I have great problems with them publishing the works of authors without their permission or the permission of that writer’s estate. They seem very shady.

I’ll read more from this applicant but here’s just one screen shot of a text message interview:

Update: September 6, 2020

I hadn’t noticed Kessinger’s Wikipedia entry before. It seems to have been generated by and maintained by bots, a common happening. Check the page’s edit history. All of the references at the bottom of its page are very old and unhelpful.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kessinger_Publishing (external link)

Also, Kessinger has updated their home page, now removing any information about themselves or providing a telephone number.

I see that still no one has yet filed a single complaint about the company with the BBB. If you are really mad about them poaching your copyrighted work, then file a complaint. Otherwise, you are all talk.

https://www.bbb.org/us/mt/whitefish/profile/publishers-book/kessinger-publishing-llc-1296-64052275 (external link)

Update – April 28, 2020

New information from the Better Business Bureau’s website. An actual phone number for Kessinger. And a street address which is just a United States Post Office. And, unfortunately, despite the outrage some feel against this company, not a single person has  has filed a complaint with the BBB. What are you waiting for?

Location of This Business
424 Baker Ave Unit 1404, Whitefish, MT 59937-7059

BBB File Opened: 9/19/2006
Years in Business: 16
Business Started: 8/15/2003
Business Started Locally: 8/15/2003

Licensing Information:
This business is in an industry that may require professional licensing, bonding or registration. BBB encourages you to check with the appropriate agency to be certain any requirements are currently being met.

Type of Entity: Limited Liability Company (LLC)

Alternate Business Name
Kessinger Publisher
Business Management
Mr. Roger Kessinger, Owner
Contact Information
Principal

Mr. Roger Kessinger, Owner
Customer Contact

Mr. Roger Kessinger, Owner
Business Categories
Publishers Book
424 Baker Ave Unit 1404

Whitefish, MT 59937-7059

http://www.kessinger.net

(406) 862-7674

NB: Update – December, 2, 2019

In putting together a book proposal I’ve come across some strange offerings from Kessinger Publishing. They’re a reprint service that charges fantastic prices compared to ordinary used books.

A used copy of the 1953 Postcards from Delaplane, for example, will run you five to six dollars at Abe.com (external link). If you mistakenly search Amazon, which does sell used books, you’ll come across this pricing structure:

Postcards From Delaplane (Kessinger Legacy Reprints)

Paperback
$21.56 Prime

Hardcover
$33.56Prime

Talk on the net is that the reprints are shoddy and full of errors. I can’t confirm that but the best advice is to always make sure you are buying a real used book and not a reprint, unless no other choice is available.

I also thought they might be in copyright violation with Delaplane’s work, however, there is a gray area with books published between 1923 and 1963. Those works may be in the public domain unless their copyright has been renewed. See the Copyright Renewal Database at Stanford (external link).

Apparently, Kessinger Publishing has taken it upon themselves to reprint tens of thousands of titles they consider in the public domain. Or, that they are just going to reprint anyway, regardless. Here’s how they describe a reprint:

“This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world’s literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.”

No e-mail or contact information is at their site. They merely list a P.O. Box number in Whitefish, Montana, although there is now a telephone number unlike years past.  Hmm.

Many questions come to mind. For one, is a book truly in the public domain if its content belongs to another copyright holder? For example, if a book is a collection of newspaper columns from The New York Times, does that book going into the public domain release all of those columns from the Times’ control? I don’t know. But I wouldn’t assume that. Best advice is to be cautious.

Update – August 25, 2019.

There appears to be a welter of publishers, many in India, that are printing out-of-print books. They in general have no right to do so, however, it is my understanding that India’s legal system does not respect American copyright law. They do what they want.

Most reprinted titles at Abe.com seem to be from print-on-demand firms. Reprinting old government papers and books, most never under copyright, is a legitimate business. But with few exceptions, in America you can’t reprint without permission.

This print-on-demand industry is so widespread that Abe.com allows you to omit these publishers when you search for a book. That is, there are so many reprints that they overwhelm Abe’s search engine with returns for these bogus books.

My guess is there is no enforcement against these people, especially when they reside in another country. Beyond the law, there are other ways to protest bad business practices. Such as filing a complaint against them at the BBB.

With Kessinger,  I see that they are not a BBB accredited business. (external link)  And, unfortunately, there are no complaints against them at the BBB. One last thing, with these reprints you never get any maps or accessory materials.

DelBook

About thomasfarley01

Freelance writer specializing in outdoor subjects, particularly rocks, gems and minerals.
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14 Responses to The Odd World of Kessinger Publishing

  1. Michael says:

    How are these reprint companies not sued for violating copyright?

    • It’s too expensive to sue given the small royalties authors collect. A lawyer would charge upfront and few writers can afford three hundred to five hundred an hour. A class action suit might work but these are extremely costly for a law firm to mount. And, in the end, a judgment might return only a few dollars to each individual, tens or hundreds of thousands to the law firm. An interesting possibility is small claims court where a judgment might return five to ten thousand dollars. These would be brought by an individual with no lawyer need. The difficult part then is collecting a judgement, truly a nightmare by itself.

  2. Robert S. Mandell says:

    “judgment” is without an “e”–unless you’re a barrister writing briefs at the Inns of Court in Great Britain. Just FYI, since the additional information came to me from a Cambridge Professor friend of mine when I found the alternate “e” spelling in one of his books. It should have had the ‘sans e’ spelling, but he cordially provided the additional background.

    • Thanks, that was just a typo. I spelled judgment the way I wanted in the sentence before. I’ve written for a long time in the law. Sometimes, if I am writing for lay people, I will use judgement with an e to keep non-legal spelling Nazis from correcting me. But then the legal types come after me.

  3. Roman says:

    I found your page through trying to research Kessinger. They’re selling my great, great grandfathers (incomplete) works for obscene prices. I can’t find information to get in touch with anyone.. yet they claim to be “digitally persevering literature for future generations.” Well, here I am. Unable to access the writings of a loved family member because of their markup. Yay….

    • They should provide a copyright release for every title they sell or prove that a work is in the public domain. They do neither and I an judging them pirates until they prove otherwise.

  4. Jason Brophy says:

    Thomas, This is regarding your latest blog. For this scam they are trying for $250, they are trying very hard with a $2,500 check but want me to purchase software.

  5. LaKesha Carter says:

    Hi I just found out about them but I just talked to someone earlier about the job and everything I been saying 30 a hour sound to good to be true but I want to know more about this company

    • $30 an hour is too good to be true. I wouldn’t expect more than $10 to $15 an hour for online work, not much more than minimum wage. You’re competing against the entire world. After five years of part time work, I eventually got to $17 an hour with my remote employer but I was in a specialized field and I had a number of skills that most do not have.

      • Sofiaalvizug@gmail.com says:

        DONT DO IT!!!! THEY JUST TAKED $1350 FROM ME

      • Okay. Contacting the local police is a good first step. They may recommend that you go to the local District Attorney’s office and that is also a logical step. They can advise you on what to do next. If they are not cooperative, ask them about how to contract the local FBI office for their region. This may be an activity that crosses state lines and as such will interest Federal authorities.

        Remember, though, the FBI likes to carry cases for many, many people, not just a few. They usually won’t take action for one person. Your best bet in interesting the FBI may be to gather as many other people who have been harmed as you were. Start a Facebook page, for example, to round up people like yourself. The more the better.

        Still, start with the local police and then move up the ladder. There are other agencies that you should probably talk to as well. I wish you the best and thanks for reporting!

  6. Sofia says:

    I have been robbed by this people!!! This is unbelievable I’m so mad I didn’t saw this page after sending them money! It was the same history, a “work from home” job offer, $30 per hour, they did an “interview” with “Tom Roger” with me on the WhatsApp they gave me, this is the phone number (205) 605 9408, they sent me a check for $1.350 then asked me to transfer it via ZELLE to samarelay@gmail.com ($750) and ronda_holly@yahoo.com ($600) then they blocked me and the check was returned, I got my bank account on negative and almost closed, I’m going to the police right now to report it. This is crazy, this people is taking money from innocent people I can’t believe it we have stop them NOW!

  7. WOW this company started off with a FACEBOOK JOB LISTING to work from home remote COVID-19!! So of course, I applied through Facebook. To have them message me with a phone number for another person in Whats App. After an hour long process, they ask me if they can send me a check for an Apple Book Pro 2, and software. *RED FLAG* WHAAT?! why on earth would someone send me money to purchase that? they said no! this is a start up fee in which you will have to pay us back for. *HUGE RED FLAG* i said nope ! nevermind! and didn’t go any further from there. Thank God I found this website, to know that I was not the only one that they attempted to mastermind and steal from. I am so sorry that happened to that one girl, thank you SO SO much for sharing. you saved my life today!!

    • Thanks for sharing your experience! I don’t know why Kessinger is still going on with this. I don’t know a single person who has been hired, however, I am getting complaint after complaint about them. I wish a government agency would get involved. Good luck and thanks.

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