The Mid-Century Remembered

Time out for art. I wish I could meet this pair. They are appearing at the Sausalito Art Festival on Labor Day. The following images are from Signe & Genna Grushovenko’s website. Please visit.

“Partners in both life and art…

Signe & Genna have been married since 1999 and collaborating for nearly as long.

Genna begins their process by applying rich layers of pattern and tone to gessoed masonite or linen supports. Signe then selects an inspiration image from their extensive collection of vintage found photos, draws with oil pastel atop the abstract underlayer using the photo for reference, and completes the image with blocky ‘panes’ of oil color.

The final results of their collaboration are multi-layered paintings with deep surfaces, crisp at first glance but rewarding the careful viewer with an undercurrent of complex tonality and colorplay.”

https://www.grushovenko.com/look-book/


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Joseph Conrad Would Agree

“Life is short and art is long and success is very far off.” Joseph Conrad

American Public television recently interviewed a glass blower, an artist who works in glass. In an exasperated tone she told the interviewer, “For me, there is no life/work balance. My work is my life.” And what a fine life that is.

Ars longa, vita brevis.

Matt Paskiet: https://glassaxis.org/visiting-artist-matt-paskiet-teaches-specialty-workshops/

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Good But Going Away

What are some of your favorite words that are being used less and less? A few of mine are:

jet set

(JD) juvenile delinquent

hullabaloo

neurotic

next-of-kin

swamp cooler

playpen

rumpus room

the military-industrial complex

fuss-budget

the ecology movement

third-world

katywampus

nonplussed

mortified

pacification

gilded

Source: https://www.slideshare.net/nielrich013/stylistics-26050112

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More Revising Examples

Before and after. The original sentences are just fine, partly making up an entertaining review of a colorful Mojave Desert town. No criticism intended. But these revisions should come to mind immediately on first read. Tighten, tighten, tighten.

Many of the Gene Autry television productions were shot at the site.

Many Gene Autry television productions were shot at the site.

Other notable television shows that were filmed here were the Cisco Kid and Judge Roy Bean.

Other notable television shows filmed here were the Cisco Kid and Judge Roy Bean.

Some of the original investors in the town were Roy Rogers, who also built the Pioneer Bowl . . . .

Some original investors in the town were Roy Rogers, who also built the Pioneer Bowl . . . .

After the filming boom of Pioneertown slowed down many of the buildings were sold . . . .

After the filming boom of Pioneertown slowed down many buildings were sold . . . .

Its post office is reported to have the distinction . . . .

Its post office reportedly has the distinction . . . .

Roy Rogers himself rolled out the first ball at the Pioneer Bowl in 1949 . . . .

Roy Rogers rolled out the first ball at the Pioneer Bowl in 1949 . . . .

There are many places to stay the night but two of them really stand out.

There are many places to stay the night but two really stand out.

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Publish Your Own Newspaper?

We’ve all heard about print on demand books. But what about print on demand newspapers? It’s possible with Newspaperclub.com (external link). Your ideas or advertising gets printed on real newspaper presses.

I am only starting to read about this retro movement, but it is exciting to think about a new medium for expression that is in fact centuries old, and once pronounced as dead by digital only acolytes.

I am thinking about how I could promote my prospecting book with this, as a broadsheet could far more effectively portray maps compared to tiny brochures. It appears that printing is all done in England, perhaps fitting for an old line, traditional medium.

Does this fire your imagination? What kind of project could you carry off if you produced your own newspaper?

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My Prospecting Life in Two Definitions

These two definitions are going in my book. They come from a door stop of a title,  A Dictionary of Mining, Mineral, and Related Terms, published in 1968 by the U.S. Department of the Interior. It’s 1,269 pages and it must weigh seven pounds. I bought it today at Amber Unicorn Books here in Las Vegas. Half-off sale. My kind of book.

fossick: a. Australian. To work out the pillars of abandoned claims, or work over waste heaps in hope of finding gold.

fossicker: a. One who searches for small amounts of mineral.  b. One who picks over old mine workings. Fossicking is casual and unsystematic mining. c. Australian. A sort of mining gleaner who overhauls old workings and refuse heaps for gold that may be contained therein.

I am definitely a fossicker. Visit this Australian site for more wonderful and colorful language. (external link)

 

 

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Thoughts on Online Geology 101: Introduction to Geology from BYU

I’m taking an online course from Brigham Young University entitled Introduction to Geology: Geology 101. (external link) While I am learning a great deal I do have some constructive criticisms.

There’s little feedback or no  interaction from other students or the Professor. You are very much alone with this course. There is no student forum with this class, consequently, no interaction with fellow students. I suspect there are not enough students at any one time to maintain a quorum. The professor seems equally absent, I had to look up his e-mail at BYU’s website as there is no direct link to him from the website to the course.

Although I have a “B” grade through five lessons, I could have scored higher had I taken this course in person. With that kind of class, you would have morning lectures and afternoon labs. During the labs you would be interacting with proctors, teaching assistants, students and possibly the professor. None of that happens online, indeed, it may be impossible to successfully take a physical science course online because of this lack. (By successful I mean a mastery of the materials, not just getting by.)

Most of my missed questions were from misinterpreting rock samples, drawing the wrong conclusions from an experiment that required a test tube and chemicals, and wrongly interpreting photos in .pdf files. All these things would have been bandied about first in an afternoon lab, none of that discussion occurs here. This is a structural problem inherent with an online course and perhaps insolvable. Although, perhaps, some short web videos would help . . . .

The $160 text book lacks an errata sheet or webpage to list errors and oddities. (internal link). As a writer and editor, I am mightily displeased, especially since an online errata webpage would cost only pennies to build. And I am sad that the author replied curtly to my polite suggestions. The mistakes  seem limited to the third chapter but that is the one chapter I read most closely. Those mistakes carry into the online supporting materials, the publisher of which has chosen not to reply.

Again, I am learning a great deal and I am looking forward to continuing the course. No introductory geology course exists in Las Vegas that I could take in person so I am glad for this class. Honestly, I could do better. And just as honestly, the course could do better.

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